Europe’s Best Street Food

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street food

One of the very best ways to experience a new culture when you’re travelling is experimenting with street food. The flavours tell the story of local agriculture, climate and cooking — it’s a wonderful way to absorb different cultures. Street food is also a great way to eat on a budget, allowing you to sample a wide variety of treats for a small amount.

European food safety laws have pushed a lot of vendors off the streets and into tiny storefronts along major roads, but street food culture is still thriving. Explore the culinary wonders available to you throughout Europe, and start your tummy-based travel to-do list today!

 

pies and buns

 

Fried Pirozhki

Where to find it: St. Petersburg, Russia

Cost: £1

  • Very similar to a meat pie, a pirozhki is typically filled with minced meat and fried instead of baked.
  • Fillings tend to be savoury (other popular choices are chicken, potatoes and vegetables), but some street vendors offer sweeter options filled with fruit.

Karjalanpiirakka

Where to find it: Helsinki, Finland

Cost: £2

  • An appetizing street pie filled with white rice and butter, then topped with a soft boiled or poached egg. Some vendors offer variety from the original with carrots, potatoes and other fillings.
  • These street pies are not like the hand pies you see walking the streets of London. The Karjalanpiirakka looks like a small, oval-shaped pizza but with a folded, pleated crust.

Pīrāgi

Where to find: Riga, Latvia

Cost: £1.50

  • Soft, fresh-baked buns stuffed with minced onion and chopped bacon make for a filling but affordable snack.
  • Street food in Latvia isn’t as prominent as in other countries, so you’ll most likely find this snack in a bakery.

 

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Fried Herring

Where to find it: Stockholm, Sweden

Cost: £3.50

  • Try the lightly breaded herring on its own or as a knäckis, a fried herring sandwich topped with cucumbers and red onion.
  • Stockholm is one of the most expensive cities to visit in all of Europe — street food is a great option if you’re on a budget.

Dürüm

Where to find it: Istanbul, Turkey

Cost: £5

  • A wrap filled with typical tasty kebab ingredients like spiced lamb, lettuce, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers and yoghurt-herb sauce.
  • The döner kebab you find in Germany is inspired by the Turkish dürüm, stuffed with similar ingredients but wrapped in a thicker pita.

Currywurst

Where to find it: Berlin, Germany

Cost: £2 – 3

  • Bite-sized slices of pork sausage smothered in ketchup and curry powder; often served with French fries.
  • An estimated 800 million currywursts are consumed in Germany every year.1

Hot Dogs

Where to find it: Reykjavik, Iceland

Cost: £2 – 3

  • Reykjavik hot dogs stand out from other hot dogs. They’re comprised mostly of lamb, with some pork and beef.
  • Typical toppings: spicy brown mustard, ketchup, raw onions, crispy fried onions, and mayonnaise with minced pickles.

Ćevapi

Where to find it: Split, Croatia

Cost: £2

  • Try these popular grilled spiced beef and pork sausages stuffed into toasted pita pockets. Ćevapi is usually topped with diced onions and red pepper spread.
  • Similar dishes are found all over Eastern Europe in places like Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Leberkäse

Where to find it: Vienna, Austria

Cost: £2 – 3

  • While leberkäse may not look appealing, the dense, salty meat found in the center of this sandwich is simply delicious. Try it topped with bacon, onions, cheese, pickles or chilli.
  • You’lll also find leberkäse in the southern part of Germany, but they will use significantly fewer toppings.

Crêpes

Where to find it: Paris, France

Cost: £3 – 5

  • Crêpes are a super versatile street food that can satisfy your appetite for breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert or a snack.
  • Try a savory crêpe filled with ham and cheese or a vegetable medley. Sweet crêpes vary just as much — try them stuffed with nutella, fruit preserves, or custards, or just order one dusted with powdered sugar.

Souvlaki

Where to find it: Athens, Greece

Cost: £1.50

  • Greek souvlaki is a must-have when walking the ancient streets of Greece. Marinated and spiced pork is wrapped in a thick, fluffy pita topped with onions, tomato and tzatziki sauce.
  • Sometimes you’ll find veal instead of pork. Internationally, chicken is also used but marinated and spiced in a similar fashion.

 

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Kroketten

Where to find it: Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Cost: £2

  • Fried mashed potato balls filled with ground beef, rolled in spices and bread crumbs.
  • After World War II, kroketten started to be mass-produced by many suppliers.2 Today, you can even get kroketten on a bun at McDonalds!

Frites

Where to find it: Brussels, Belgium

Cost: £2

  • Slices of Bintje potatoes, deep-fried twice and served in a cone — what’s not to love?
  • While fries may seem like a common commodity, Belgium excels at dipping sauces. Garlic mayonnaise is a popular choice.

Vareny

Where to find it: Kiev, Ukraine

Cost: £2 – 3

  • Vareny are boiled dumplings, similar to pot stickers, served in sets of 3 – 5 savory or sweet pockets.
  • There are more than 50 flavor combinations to choose from, so ask the street vendor if you can mix and match flavours.

 

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Gelato

Where to find it: Florence, Italy

Cost: £3 – 4

  • Gelato, the smoother cousin to traditional ice cream, can come in hundreds of flavors. Pick some up from a gelateria for the best quality.
  • Italian law dictates that gelato must contain at least 3.5% butterfat.3

Churros

Where to find it: Barcelona, Spain

Cost: £1

  • Deep-fried sticks of dough, rolled in a mix of sugar and cinnamon.
  • Try this sweet treat on its own, or paired with a hot chocolate or coffee.

Kürtoskalacs

Where to find it: Budapest, Hungary

Cost: £2.50

  • A traditional Hungarian pastry spiraled over a broad spool and baked over a wood fire.
  • The flakey layers make it easy to break apart and share with your traveling companion.

Pastéis de Belém

Where to find it: Lisbon, Portugal

Cost: £2

  • These pastries are light and flakey with a subtle taste of cinnamon and sugar. The shell is filled with a sugary, creamy egg-based custard to balance out the crust.
  • Over 19,000 tarts are sold daily at Antiga Confeitaria de Belém in Lisbon.4

 

 

 

References

1Connelly, M. A. (18 December 2014). 20 must-try street foods around the world. Retrieved 10 August, 2016, from http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/20-must-try-street-foods-around-the-world#!15-currywurst

2Wikipedia. (n.d.). Croquette. Retrieved 10 August 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croquette#Netherlands

3Wikipedia. (n.d.). Gelato. Retrieved 10 August, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelato

4Lonely Planet. “The 11 best street foods worth blowing your diet over.” Lonely Planet. N.p., 27 Apr. 2012. Web. 11 Aug 2016.

About 

Babs is a content writer at Enova International, Inc. with a Bachelors in Cinema Studies and English from the University of Illinois (ILL-INI!). She loves binge watching musicals, reading in the (sporadic) Chicago sunshine and discovering great new places to eat. Accio, tacos! Find about more about her on Google+.

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